Everyone I Know Is Trying to Refinance

June 25, 2013 No Comments »
Everyone I Know Is Trying to Refinance

There’s been a lot of talk (and worry) that the higher mortgage rates of late might derail the apparent housing market recovery.

After all, many believe the only reason things were improving was because of the ultra-low rates the Fed facilitated with the likes of QE3.

Without them, some argue, home prices would have to come back to more realistic levels. And optimism would probably also be somewhat deflated.

Unfortunately, such a scenario was not feasible, seeing that foreclosures were getting out of control, and lower prices would have meant so many more would have lost their homes, either involuntarily or by choice.

Higher Rates Are Motivational

Interestingly, I’ve seen a different reaction, albeit an early one. Many individuals I know who own homes are seeking to refinance their mortgages. Why they didn’t do it last year or even last month is beyond me, but we all know people procrastinate.

Many also grew complacent with the low rates, as it got to a point where one just assumed rates would keep on falling. I’m sure most people figured there was more downside in store, and if rates did happen to rise, they probably would do so slowly.

But now that mortgage rates have shot up in no time at all, it seems to have given many people a kick in the rear to finally go about getting that refinance, even if rates are significantly higher than they were just weeks ago.

One friend of mine seemed content locking in a rate of 4.5% on a 30-year fixed, even though he may have been able to snag a rate of around 3.75% last month.

He didn’t even seem that upset about missing the lower rates, and instead looked at the bigger picture. In the grand scheme of things, a 4.5% 30-year fixed mortgage is still a great deal.

Another pal of mine used the recent rise in rates as motivation to finally start calling around and inquiring about a refinance.

For him, there were home equity issues that made it difficult to refinance (he’s not eligible for HARP). So you can’t blame him for waiting for his home to appreciate a bit more, and alleviate some LTV concerns.

He too seemed happy enough to snag a rate at current levels. He’s even looking at a 15-year mortgage instead of his current 30-year as a way to take advantage of a lower rate and pay down his mortgage faster, without too much of a cost burden.

Possible Mortgage Rate Easing Ahead?

All said, it seems everyone is keeping things in perspective, despite the less attractive pricing of late.

And who knows, we may even see rates fall a bit over the next couple weeks, seeing that they increased so much so fast.

The market probably overreacted to the Fed news, so there’s definitely a chance things could improve in the near-term.

Additionally, the Fed owns a ton of the mortgage-backed securities out there, so they can control the price to some degree, even if everyone else wants to bail.

Whatever direction mortgage rates go in the next month or so, loan originators should stand to benefit from all the last-minute refinancers.

Banks and lenders will probably receive a flurry of refinance applications in coming weeks as more borrowers get off the fence and take advantage before it’s seemingly too late.

Unfortunately, borrowers might have to contend with sizable delays, so if you’re refinancing, get your ducks in a row to avoid any potential mishaps.

As far as home purchases go, the rate increase alone shouldn’t deter too many folks. It may disqualify some if their proposed payments rise too much, but I doubt it would completely dictate one’s decision to buy a home.

Remember, rates would have to rise to about 7% for the median priced home to fall out of reach for the average American family, so there’s still plenty of room.

Read more: Do higher mortgage rates lead to lower home prices?

Compare Today’s Mortgage Rates

Leave A Response