Mortgage Bust Market Cap Impact

April 16, 2008 No Comments »

cap

What a difference a mortgage crisis can make. Take a look at select mortgage stocks and their market cap declines from June 2007 to the present date to see the magnitude of the ongoing credit crunch.

The companies below are listed by their market cap from June 2007 (compiled by OECD), followed by their market cap as of their April 16, 2008 closing price.

Bank of America
was worth $216.92 billion, now $164.77 billion

Barclays was worth $91.28 billion, now $62.88 billion

BB&T was worth $22.35 billion, now $17.82 billion

Bear Stearns was worth $20.24 billion , now $1.48 billion

Chase was worth $162.73 billion, now $152.85 billion

Citi was worth $255.14 billion, now $122.95 billion

Countrywide was worth $20.95 billion, now $2.9 billion

Credit Suisse was worth $74.26 billion, now $54.52 billion

Deutsche Bank was worth $72.38 billion, now $59.92 billion

Fifth Third was worth $21.18 billion, now $10.71 billion

First Horizon was worth $4.93 billion, now $1.59 billion

Goldman Sachs was worth $86.58 billion, now $66.64 billion

IndyMac was worth $2.15 billion, now $353 million

KeyCorp was worth $13.34 billion, now $9.68 billion

Lehman Brothers was worth $39.50 billion, now $23.10 billion

M&T Bank was worth $11.42 bilion, now $9.89 billion

Merrill Lynch was worth $71.50 billion, now $44.06 billion

Morgan Stanley was worth $89.02 billion, now $50.29 billion

National City was worth $21.10 billion, now $5.09 billion

PNC was worth $24.13 billion, now $22.27 billion

SunTrust was worth $29.90 billion, now $18.44 billion

UBS was worth $115.79 billion, now $65.30 billion

U.S. Bancorp was worth $56.84 billion, now $57.34 billion

Wachovia was worth $97.43 billion, now $49.93 billion

WaMu was worth $36.78 billion, now $9.62 billion

Wells Fargo was worth $116.95 billion, now $95.65 billion

As you can see, only one company on the list saw improvement: U.S. Bancorp

(photo: darwinbell)

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